Mission

We help writers of all genres and experience levels to produce and promote professionally published work. We do this by providing read-and-critique sessions, educational activities, ongoing author support, networking opportunities and a welcoming, inclusive community.


  • Upcoming events

    Tuesday, June 13, 2017 at 07:00 PM through August 31, 2017 · $25.00 USD
    Zula Bryant Library in Cedar Hill, TX

    Dallas Area Writers Group Short Story Contest

    Dallas Area Writers Group

    2017 Short Story Contest

    SUBMISSION DEADLINE AUGUST 31, 2017

    The Dallas Area Writers Group (DAWG) is kicking off the summer with a new challenge to take your mind off of the heat. DAWG is inviting writers to enter its first short story competition. Do you think you can write a winning short story in 3,000 words or less? Get those creative juices flowing! We're looking for writers with a story to tell...

     

    ENTER TO WIN CASH PRIZES AND BE PUBLISHED IN

                                   TEXAS SHORTS 

    THE DALLAS AREA WRITERS GROUP'S FIRST ANTHOLOGY OF SHORT STORIES

     

    Winners receive:

    • $150, $100, and $50 in cash prizes for first, second, and third place winners

    • Recognition in DAWG publications

    • All entries receive publication consideration in the DAWG anthology - publishing in 2018

    To enter:

    • Word count must be between 800-3,000 words

    • Original unpublished stories only

    • Open to all genres, some restrictions apply

    • First story entry is free for paid DAWG members

    • Contest ends August 31st at 11:59pm

    • Visit www.dallaswriters.org for complete rules, submission instructions, and fees

    Winners will be announced at the Dallas Area Writers Group "Write to Publish: Climbing Toward Success" Writing Workshop on October 21, 2017.

    Wednesday, August 16, 2017 at 07:00 PM
    Simmons Center in Euless, TX

    Wednesday Night Read and Critique

    The Workshop meets EVERY Wednesday, regardless of holidays or weather. We welcome visitors to come to any of these regular weekly meeting. There is no need to notify us in advance, just show up! It has been years since a meeting was canceled for any reason.

    We meet at 7 p.m. at the Simmons Center, 508 Simmons Drive in Euless, TX and rarely go past 10:00 p.m. Many continue on after the meeting at a nearby IHOP on 183 and Westpark/Murphy in Euless.


  • Latest from the blog

    Let Me Tell You About My Precious

    DFWCon will be my fifteenth writers’ conference. In my heart, I still feel like a newbie. In my head, I know that’s nonsense. And I have learned some things along the way. Two years ago, I penned a blog post called Finding Your Tribe. In it, I argued that conferences are about finding your tribe. That’s still true. There’s nothing more important than finding or rejoining your tribe at a writers’ conference. But there is also some business to be done. For many first-time con-goers, the conference is about “The Pitch.” That perfectly wonderful opportunity to go all Gollum over their novel. They fret about which agent to pick. They fret about over what clothes to wear. But most of all, they fret about making fools of themselves. I’m here to tell you to relax. Because if you’re like me, you will absolutely make a fool of yourself. The pitch will be so bad the agent will burst out laughing and then check her watch and then ask if you’d like to do it again because there’s still plenty of time. And that’s when you’ll realize… It’s just a pitch. It’s not a life-or-death situation. It’s not a make-or-break moment in your writing career. It’s merely one opportunity to tell one agent about your work with only two potential outcomes. The agent will either ask you to submit something. Or they won’t. That’s it. They won’t punch you or scream at you or call you a fool if the pitch is bad (though I have had an agent come close to that last one). They won’t applaud you, sign you, or give you a book deal if it’s good. The agent will either ask you to submit something. Or they won’t. That’s it. And here’s something else to remember, you have no control over whether your novel resonates with an agent. Many perfectly well-written novels never see the light of day for this simple reason. You can’t control it. But you can control pitching and querying more agents and, more importantly, writing more books. Persistence is the only way to increase the likelihood that your work will resonate with somebody. Don’t get me wrong, every pitch is an opportunity and shouldn’t be wasted. You should prepare. You should practice. You should be sure you hit all the key notes required to be successful. But then you should pitch again. And again. And again. And you should write another book. And another. And another. And as for that first one, it’s just a pitch. So don’t sweat it. And if you do, then commiserate over it with your tribe.  -- Brian Tracey, DFWWW Director and Member since 2012
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    Process? What Process?

    A few months ago I was talking to my friend about my lack of progress on my current project: “I SHOULD HAVE A PROCESS BY NOW, BROOKE! WHY DON’T I HAVE A PROCESS?” You see, I’d just read a book on writing that addressed how to write fast and regularly. It all sounded so easy, but when I tried it, I stopped after only two days. This is most likely due to my general lack of follow-up. Seriously, it’s a minor miracle I ever completed one manuscript, let alone five. But, this borrowed process I was testing out didn’t click. So, I went back to my higgly-piggly way of writing when inspired (which means I spent most of my time procrastinating). Turns out, that’s an even worse process than borrowing someone else’s. Which is why I’m going to lay out, right here, what my actual, real-deal process is. And hopefully it will help you figure out yours. First, what is process? Is it the way you create a book, or the way you get it down on paper? I think those are two different things. Let me explain. Creating a book starts with an idea, a character, a plot, a setting, and everything spirals out from there. With Sawbones, it was the setting. With Stillwater, it was the character of Ellie Martin. With my current project, it was the plot. (You see why I say I have no process?) Inspiration comes when it comes, with little regard to what I want, or what is the easiest way for me to create a story (FYI, it’s with character). During the creation phase there’s a lot of reading, thinking, sitting around and staring into the distance, note taking. Regardless of the genesis of the story, it never clicks until I get a handle on the characters, and who they are. Once I have that, everything else falls into place. Now, to get the story down on paper. Am I a plotter or pantser? Morning writer or evening writer? Daily word goals or time goals? Yes. I winged my way through the first five books, with a good idea of main plot points, but nothing at all like an actual outline or plan, though I had a clear idea how each ended, as I do with my current project. When writing BLOOD OATH, I sat in front of the computer every morning and said, “What happens next? Let’s have them get caught in a thunderstorm on the plains with nowhere to hide! And Laura gets separated from the group! And, almost dies! There’s a fire!” I’m not making that up for this article by the way. Read all about it May 23! (shameless plug) My current project started with a plot, and an outline! I’m not surprised that it’s been tough going; I hate being told what to do, even by my well-intentioned plotting past self. My early struggles stemmed from my lack of character understanding. Once I had that, and had decided on “how” to tell the story (POV, etc), the words started to flow. My advice: It doesn’t matter when you write, or what your daily writing goals are, only that you write daily and have goals. Do what works for you, however imperfect or wheels off it may sound to the disciplined writers who love to humblebrag about their daily schedule of early rising, writing, mid-morning walk, writing, power nap, writing, all of which leads to their typical 5000-word day. When it comes down to it, the reader doesn’t care how the sausage is made, only that it is, and that it’s delicious. Melissa Lenhardt is the author the Jack McBride mystery series, as well as the Laura Elliston historical fiction series. Her debut mystery, STILLWATER, was a finalist for the 2014 Whidbey Writers’ MFA Alumni Emerging Writers Contest, and SAWBONES, her historical fiction debut, was hailed as a "thoroughly original, smart and satisfying hybrid, perhaps a new subgenre: the feminist Western" by Lone Star Literary Life. A lifelong Texan, she lives in the Dallas area with her husband and two sons. Her latest book, SAWBONES is now available in paperback. Her next novel, BLOOD OATH will be available on May 23, 2017 (as shamelessly alluded to earlier).   
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